Skills Recognition System

Skills Recognition System As opportunities to acquire skills are offered not only at school but also at variou続きを読む

SKY[Skills and Knowledge for Youth] ホーム Skills Recognition System

Skills Recognition System

As opportunities to acquire skills are offered not only at school but also at various places such as workplaces and training centers, the ability to show acquired skills is also even more important. Even if a person has acquired certain skills, if there is no means to show their skills, it will be challenging to get a job that can make full use of his or her acquired skills. Thus, the skill recognition system is attracting attention as a means to verify acquired skills.

The skill recognition system is a system for acknowledgment of acquired skills by employers, training providers, and public institutions. The system is intended to recognize skills that correspond to various types of learning outside school education (Jiri, 2016). Singh (2011) argues that a skill recognition system is particularly important in developing countries. In developing countries, there is a large informal sector, and the workers acquire skills mainly through apprenticeships, informal training centers, and on-the-job training. Under such situations, a school diploma alone is insufficient for demonstrating what actual skills have been acquired. Given these circumstances, it is crucial not only to expand existing school systems but also develop a bottom-up approach based on a skill recognition system (Singh, 2011). OECD (2010) indicates that skill recognition itself does not directly contribute to productivity, but is essential for enabling individuals to understand skills that are in demand and engage in work that suits them.

Currently, skill recognition efforts are being carried out in many African countries. Hofmann (2011) introduces the case of Benin and Ghana. In Benin, the local government has signed an agreement with a local business association, and jointly evaluates the end of on-site training twice a year. The Evaluation Committee is made up of representatives from government, business associations, and parents associations. Successful candidates receive certification, and the names are broadcast on local radio stations. In the case of Ghana, the Ghana National Tailors and Dressmaking Association conduct a national skill test for post-graduate apprentices twice a year. The one-day exams are held at approximately 50 centers nationwide. Since 2000, around 65,000 apprentices have taken this exam. Successful candidates receive certificates at graduation ceremonies organized by the association at zonal levels. In this way, each country has its own skill recognition efforts to properly recognize skills acquired outside of school.

(Yujiro Yamazaki)

References:

Hofmann, C. (2011). “Upgrading Informal Apprenticeship-Challenges and Achievements” in K. King (ed.) Towards a New Global World of Skills Development? TVET’s Turn to Make its Mark. Norrangnews 46. Geneva.
Jiri, B. (2016). Strengthening skills recognition systems: recommendations for key stakeholders. International Labour Office, Skills and Employability Branch. Geneva: ILO.
OECD (2010). Recognizing non-formal and informal learning: Outcomes, policies, and practices. http://www.oecd.org/edu/innovation-education/recognisingnon-formalandinformallearningoutcomespoliciesandpractices.htm
Singh, M. (2011).”Skills Recognition in the Informal Sector” in K. King (ed.) Towards a New Global World of Skills Development? TVET’s Turn to Make its Mark. Norrangnews 46. Geneva.